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Posts Tagged ‘suicide’

There’s this big puzzle I’ve been trying to figure out for years, and it’s my brain. I have to catch up with what’s going on in the mental health world, or I feel like that puzzle is never going to get solved. And the more my mood swings grumble at me, the more I go into hypomanic detective mode.

So I ran across this article in NIMH’s Science News section. I love this part of their website. I remember when I was a kid – and this was before we even had a color TV – I learned that doctors did research, and I always wondered what they were discovering. Always did like watching PBS more than the Perils of Penelope Pitstop. After I got older, I forgot all about that show…until I got cable TV and found a whole channel devoted to old TV cartoons. Rooby-Roo!!

Okay…focus…

Results of the Study

The researchers found that nearly 40 percent of those identified as having major depression also had symptoms of subthreshold hypomania (mania that lasts less than four days at a time). Compared to those with major depression alone, those with depression plus subthreshold hypomania tended to be younger at age of onset and to have had more coexisting health problems, more episodes of depression and more suicide attempts.

I could have told them that. No, really.

I think the reason I was so interested in what the doctors were discovering is because I knew I was a little off and I wished I knew why. I spent many of my pre-teen and teenage years trying to compensate in various ways for feeling so blue, and usually overdoing it. Then I would go back to withdrawing from the world because in the process of overcompensating, I had usually done something to embarrass myself. The cycle got a little more amplified over time until my late teens, by which time the ups and downs and my inability to deal with them had become painfully obvious.

The more I think about it, the more I remember being sick, too. Looking back, I think it was partly from flipping between being sedentary and being agitated. There were headaches and allergies and upset stomachs – and I remember feeling a lot better when I discovered that four Tylenol were better than two. The MDs didn’t help much. I got diagnosed with nonspecific this or that all the time in my late teens and early 20s. That was before I saw a psychiatrist and life started to make so much more sense.

Of course you’re going to get sick when your body is being unstable. We’ve always heard that it’s so important for us to take care of ourselves and be firm about giving ourselves and our kids healthy foods and a stable environment. I think we’re just now discovering the full effect of WHY we should do that. I guess the researchers can’t just take people’s word for it, though.

Can we get away from the old “because I said so” script from childhood and start being honest about the fact that mental health and physical health are intertwined in real life?

I’m talking to the people who have trouble with everyday struggles, not to the people in strait jackets. It takes practice to watch the ups and downs and to notice when the coping skills are crumbling. It takes a lot of discipline to put your foot down with yourself or your kids when you notice the subthreshold hypomania is trading jabs with the depression and something’s got to give. Find a good doctor and stay on top of your health before you end up in a corner staring at cartoons and hating life.

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The diagnostic bible of the American Psychiatric Association is getting a makeover. A rough draft of version 5 (which is still being debated by the powers that be) is posted at http://www.DSM5.org. And this debate is going to be a dilly.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is the manual that doctors, insurers, and scientists use in deciding what is officially considered a mental disorder and how to tell if someone has it. Every now and then they decide to re-evaluate this based on the latest research findings. In a new twist, they were seeking feedback via the Internet from both psychiatrists and the general public about whether the changes will be helpful before finalizing them. That ended in April. Now they have a committee (called the DSM-5 work group on their website) reviewing the comments; and between public input, APA member input, and private research, they will have the new version ready for publication by May of 2013.

Why so long? Take a look at their website, especially the timeline. Then check out the list of diagnostic categories on the home page. These are only the general categories. Specific disorders in each category can be seen by clicking on the name of the general category. All things considered, that final list is going to be huge – when they decide what will be on it and why.

Here’s one issue that they have to decide before 2013. Is Gender Identity Disorder a physical problem, a mental problem, or just another way for humans to behave? The LGBT community is already on the edge of their seats waiting for the APA to have an official opinion, and one way or another, that decision will make headlines for weeks.

My personal source of amusement comes from the fact that, at the moment, PMS is lumped in with bipolar disorder in the Mood Disorders category. I have both, I can tell the difference between the two, and I think that putting them in the same diagnostic category is hilarious. PMS is a physical problem with emotional side effects, and doesn’t belong in the DSM at all (although I think several men around the world would loudly disagree with me).

In other categories, the APA is officially considering hoarding, skin-picking, tics, and olfactory reference syndrome (delusional beliefs about one’s own body odor) as formally classified Anxiety Disorders. Binge eating is also being considered for placement with anorexia and bulimia in the Eating Disorders category. There’s an idea. I could get insurance to pay for a doctor to help me stop pigging out.

Seriously, if you are concerned about the diagnostic process when it comes to mental disorders, keep checking back for updates to their website. I hope that they’re carefully considering the comments of the people who have to personally deal with these issues every day, and not just letting the insurance companies tell the APA how to interpret the research.

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1-800-273-TALK. Call this number if you are thinking that it’s time to end it all. Why? You might appreciate it later when you’re in a better frame of mind. It might help you understand that there are people out there that really do care. It might help you see that those thoughts might be just a symptom of something bigger that’s messing up your mind. If that’s all it is, wouldn’t you want to find out what’s wrong so you can get back to the life you really want to live?

There are more and more studies being done to understand how big of a problem this really is in our country. Here are just some of the highlights:

http://archpsyc.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/66/4/398

Most suicides committed by males age 18-24 had psych problems at age 8.

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/science-news/2009/black-teens-especially-girls-at-high-risk-for-suicide-attempts.shtml

Female black teens are at risk for suicide, even if they have never been diagnosed with a mental illness.

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k9/165/suicide.cfm

Around one percent of adult Americans planned to commit suicide last year, and half of those actually tried it. A little under four percent of adult Americans admitted to thinking about it, and that number almost doubled when they looked at just those between 18 and 25 years old. How many of us aren’t even admitting that we think about this?

Call 1-800-273-TALK. I’ll bet they’ll help even if you’re just worried about someone that is close to you. Pull the old “my friend has this problem” if you need to. Just talk about it with someone who deals with this stuff all the time, and try to find out if there’s something bigger going on that’s making it easier to think that way. You might be surprised at the change it makes in your mood and your motivation to move forward.

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